August

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    Machine of Death Kickstarter backer Nateman is here from Australia to play a round of MOD with Kris and David!
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September

October

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    A quote from Howard Thurman, via Tracy Holloway
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    A quote from Howard Thurman, via Tracy Holloway

    Ryan Estrada originally shared this post:

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    Seminal.

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    The Enigma of Amigara Fault by Junji Ito - Page 1

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    MYSTERY FRUIT
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    MYSTERY FRUIT

    MYSTERY FRUIT

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    Can anybody help me identify these fruits? They grow on trees here in Los Angeles, though I'm not sure if they're native. Both are fleshy with pits.
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    Can anybody help me identify these fruits? They grow on trees here in Los Angeles, though I'm not sure if they're native. Both are fleshy with pits.
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    Can anybody help me identify these fruits? They grow on trees here in Los Angeles, though I'm not sure if they're native. Both are fleshy with pits.

    MYSTERY FRUIT (2 photos)

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    MYSTERY FRUIT
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    MYSTERY FRUIT

    MYSTERY FRUIT

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    This week's experiment.
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    This week's experiment.
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    Thomas Jefferson, in a letter to James Madison, 1789:

    "... No society can make a perpetual constitution, or even a perpetual law. The earth belongs always to the living generation. They may manage it then, and what proceeds from it, as they please, during their usufruct. They are masters too of their own persons, and consequently may govern them as they please. But persons and property make the sum of the objects of government. The constitution and the laws of their predecessors extinguished then in their natural course with those who gave them being. This could preserve that being till it ceased to be itself, and no longer.

    "Every constitution then, and every law, should naturally expires at the end of 19 years. If it be enforced longer, it is an act of force, and not of right...It might be indeed if every form of government were so perfectly contrived that the will of the majority could always be obtained fairly and without impediment. But this is true of no form. The people cannot assemble themselves. Their representation is unequal and vicious. Various checks are opposed to every legislative proposition. Factions get possession of the public councils. Bribery corrupts them. Personal interests lead them astray from the general interests of their constituents: and other impediments arise so as to prove to every practical man that a law of limited duration is much more manageable...

    "At first blush it may be rallied, as a theoretical speculation: but examination will prove it to be solid and salutary. It would furnish matter for a fine preamble to our first law for appropriating the public revenue; and it will exclude at the threshold of our new government the contagious and ruinous errors of this quarter of the globe, which have armed despots with means, not sanctioned by nature, for binding in chains their fellow men. We have already given in example one effectual check to the Dog of war by transferring the power of letting him loose from the Executive to the Legislative body, from those who are to spend to those who are to pay. I should be pleased to see this second obstacle held out by us also in the first instance."
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    Thomas Jefferson, in a letter to James Madison, 1789:

    "... No society can make a perpetual constitution, or even a perpetual law. The earth belongs always to the living generation. They may manage it then, and what proceeds from it, as they please, during their usufruct. They are masters too of their own persons, and consequently may govern them as they please. But persons and property make the sum of the objects of government. The constitution and the laws of their predecessors extinguished then in their natural course with those who gave them being. This could preserve that being till it ceased to be itself, and no longer.

    "Every constitution then, and every law, should naturally expires at the end of 19 years. If it be enforced longer, it is an act of force, and not of right...It might be indeed if every form of government were so perfectly contrived that the will of the majority could always be obtained fairly and without impediment. But this is true of no form. The people cannot assemble themselves. Their representation is unequal and vicious. Various checks are opposed to every legislative proposition. Factions get possession of the public councils. Bribery corrupts them. Personal interests lead them astray from the general interests of their constituents: and other impediments arise so as to prove to every practical man that a law of limited duration is much more manageable...

    "At first blush it may be rallied, as a theoretical speculation: but examination will prove it to be solid and salutary. It would furnish matter for a fine preamble to our first law for appropriating the public revenue; and it will exclude at the threshold of our new government the contagious and ruinous errors of this quarter of the globe, which have armed despots with means, not sanctioned by nature, for binding in chains their fellow men. We have already given in example one effectual check to the Dog of war by transferring the power of letting him loose from the Executive to the Legislative body, from those who are to spend to those who are to pay. I should be pleased to see this second obstacle held out by us also in the first instance."
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    Thomas Jefferson, in a letter to James Madison, 1789:

    "... No society can make a perpetual constitution, or even a perpetual law. The earth belongs always to the living generation. They may manage it then, and what proceeds from it, as they please, during their usufruct. They are masters too of their own persons, and consequently may govern them as they please. But persons and property make the sum of the objects of government. The constitution and the laws of their predecessors extinguished then in their natural course with those who gave them being. This could preserve that being till it ceased to be itself, and no longer.

    "Every constitution then, and every law, should naturally expires at the end of 19 years. If it be enforced longer, it is an act of force, and not of right...It might be indeed if every form of government were so perfectly contrived that the will of the majority could always be obtained fairly and without impediment. But this is true of no form. The people cannot assemble themselves. Their representation is unequal and vicious. Various checks are opposed to every legislative proposition. Factions get possession of the public councils. Bribery corrupts them. Personal interests lead them astray from the general interests of their constituents: and other impediments arise so as to prove to every practical man that a law of limited duration is much more manageable...

    "At first blush it may be rallied, as a theoretical speculation: but examination will prove it to be solid and salutary. It would furnish matter for a fine preamble to our first law for appropriating the public revenue; and it will exclude at the threshold of our new government the contagious and ruinous errors of this quarter of the globe, which have armed despots with means, not sanctioned by nature, for binding in chains their fellow men. We have already given in example one effectual check to the Dog of war by transferring the power of letting him loose from the Executive to the Legislative body, from those who are to spend to those who are to pay. I should be pleased to see this second obstacle held out by us also in the first instance."

    Popular Basis of Political Authority: Thomas Jefferson to James Madison

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    Today's experiment. These are definitely getting more polished.
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    Today's experiment. These are definitely getting more polished.
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    Daddy simply had enough one day. “Enough,” he screamed.
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    Daddy simply had enough one day. “Enough,” he screamed.

    Richard Stevens originally shared this post:

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    These things seem to be getting somewhat more complicated
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    These things seem to be getting somewhat more complicated
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    Today's experiment.
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    Today's experiment.
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September




David Malki

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